Ride Engine Futura Foil Quick Start Guide - Ride Engine
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Ride Engine Futura Foil Quick Start Guide

Quick Start Guide for your Futura surf foil:

If you’re reading this, chances are you either have a surf foil or are thinking about getting one. You’ve probably heard us say this already, but we’ll say it again: Foiling will completely change the way you look at the ocean. It will never replace surfing, but if you’re anything like the crew at Ride Engine, it will add a truckload of fuel to the fire you’ve always had for playing in the waves.

Before you paddle out and learn your first lessons in flight, we have a few tips and pointers that will help you get started the right way.

Here’s Ride Engine founder Coleman Buckley to explain the basic foil settings for getting started, and the unique advantages a Ride Engine foil has once you’ve learned the basics.


Key points:

  • Important maintenance: Wrap every bolt in Teflon tape and/or grease to prevent seizing and fusing together due to saltwater exposure. Rinse your foil after every use and take it apart regularly.
  • When learning, attach your mast directly through the front wing and slide your mast all the way back in the track. This gives you the most control over your front foot pressure.
  • As you progress, you can start to move foil forward in the track. This will help with glide and pumping ability.
  • Learn in small, crumbly, mushy waves clear of other surfers.
  • When learning, paste the front of the board down on the water. Focus on front foot pressure to keep the board down. The objective is to get a feel for the foil with the board on the water first.
  • When you’re ready to foil don’t lean back, just use slightly less front foot pressure. You want to take off slowly, at a controlled angle like an airplane, not straight up like a helicopter.
  • Stitch position allows you to move the wing forward while keeping the mast farther back. When you’re ready, give it a try and see if you like the difference.
  • Take a screwdriver and hex key to the beach so you can play around with your setup and figure out what you like best. Try different positions back-to-back.